what is elastic rebound

What Is Elastic Rebound? Elastic rebound is what happens to the crustal material on either side of a fault during an earthquake. The idea is that a fault is stuck until the strain accumulated in the rock on either side of the fault has overcome the friction making it stick.

What is elastic rebound in earthquakes? Elastic rebound is what happens to the crustal material on either side of a fault during an earthquake. The idea is that a fault is stuck until the strain accumulated in the rock on either side of the fault has overcome the friction making it stick.

What is elastic rebound quizlet? Elastic rebound refers to how the slippage along a fault (i.e., earthquake) allows the deformed rock to regain its original shape in a new location.

How does elastic rebound cause a tsunami? Elastic rebound theory. Stresses build on both sides of a fault, causing the rocks to deform plastically (Time 2). When the stresses become too great, the rocks break and end up in a different location (Time 3). This releases the built up energy and creates an earthquake.

Why is elastic rebound theory important for the study of earthquakes?

earthquake prediction The elastic rebound theory of earthquake sources allows rough prediction of the occurrence of large shallow earthquakes. Harry F. Reid gave, for example, a crude forecast of the next great earthquake near San Francisco.

What is the difference between elastic deformation and elastic rebound?

How are elastic rebound and elastic deformation different? Elastic deformation causes objects to bend, whereas rebound causes objects to return to their original shape.

Which statement best describes elastic rebound theory?

Which of the following best describes “elastic rebound” theory of earthquakes? As an earthquake occurs, the elastically deformed rocks along the fault spring back to their original shape as much as possible.

How does elastic rebound theory help to explain how earthquakes happen quizlet?

What is elastic rebound theory? Explains fault rupture and earthquake generation; sudden release of elastic strain that built up along a fault lets out seismic energy.

Who made the elastic rebound theory?

Elastic rebound theory is one of the central ideas to the mechanics of earthquakes and was originally proposed by Reid (1910) following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake on the San Andreas Fault.

What are S waves also called?

An S wave, or shear wave, is a seismic body wave that shakes the ground back and forth perpendicular to the direction the wave is moving.

What does the elastic rebound theory states?

Elastic rebound theory states that rock will deform plastically as stresses build up until the stresses become too great and the rock breaks. Earthquakes occur at all types of plate boundaries.

Which of the following is part of the elastic rebound theory?

Which of the following is part of the elastic rebound theory? A rock that has been deformed by movement along a fault can suddenly snap back to its original shape.

Why are seismic gaps important?

A seismic gap is a segment of an active fault known to produce significant earthquakes that has not slipped in an unusually long time, compared with other segments along the same structure. … Any large and longstanding gap is, therefore, considered to be the fault segment most likely to suffer future earthquakes.

Does liquefaction cause earthquake?

Liquefaction takes place when loosely packed, water-logged sediments at or near the ground surface lose their strength in response to strong ground shaking. Liquefaction occurring beneath buildings and other structures can cause major damage during earthquakes.

Why is it important to study prehistoric earthquakes?

Why is it important to study prehistoric earthquakes? To determine the recurrence intervals and likely size of earthquakes to help people in a region plan for future seismic events.

What seismic wave causes the most damage?

Surface waves travel along the surface. There are two types of body waves: P-waves travel fastest and through solids, liquids, and gases; S-waves only travel through solids. Surface waves are the slowest, but they do the most damage in an earthquake.

What is the difference between the epicenter and the focus of an earthquake?

The focus is the place inside Earth’s crust where an earthquake originates. The point on the Earth’s surface directly above the focus is the epicenter. When energy is released at the focus, seismic waves travel outward from that point in all directions.

What is Al wave?

noun Geology. an earthquake wave that travels around the earth’s surface and is usually the third conspicuous wave to reach a seismograph.

What are the 3 types of seismic waves?

There are three major kinds of seismic waves: P, S, and surface waves. P and S waves together are sometimes called body waves because they can travel through the body of the earth, and are not trapped near the surface. A P wave is a sound wave traveling through rock.

How do plate tectonics and elastic rebound theory explain the occurrence of earthquakes?

Elastic rebound theory Before an earthquake, the buildup of stress in the rocks on either side of a fault results in gradual deformation. Eventually, this deformation exceeds the frictional force holding the rocks together and sudden slip occurs along the fault.

Do earthquakes happen in seismic gaps?

seismic gap For some seismic gaps, no earthquakes have been observed historically, but it is believed that the fault segment is capable of producing earthquakes on some other basis, such as plate-motion information or strain measurements.

What is theory of seismic gap?

Seismic Gap Theory. Seismic Gap Theory. Theory predicting the relative size and frequency of earthquakes in a given area, depending on the size and the frequency of other earthquakes in the area.

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